About your Search

20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
of that part of the savings that the majority leader reid hopes to get is from the war in afghanistan and iraq beginning to wind down. and the cbo has looked at that and said there's a trillion worth of savings that's not real savings because everybody knows the war will wind down. when you look at it as i see it harry reid's proposal is about $950 billion worth of savings. john boehner is $917. quite similar. not the 2.2 or 2.4 that's being talked about. so we do have to do more in term of the immediate cuts in order to extend it for the period of time the president would like. the alternative is this two step process. a trillion dollars now and then have this special committee that would meet and report by the end of november and then there would be additional savings under the boehner proposal. that's almost $2 trillion additional savings, 1.1 trillion. >> the president says he doesn't want to have another formal vote next year and put the country through this ordeal once again right in the middle of elections. he has a point there, right? >> well, wolf, he doesn't have much a point of putt
night between front line troops in afghanistan and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen who's visiting them this weekend. somewhat unbelievably, several u.s. troops said their major concern was not getting paid because of this budget fight in washington. in response, mullen was blunt. he said it would be devastating. well, today our pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski followed up in an exclusive conversation with admiral mullen. >> reporter: brian, admiral mullen fully expected to talk to the soldiers and marines about the war here in afghanistan. not the one in washington. >> they weren't talking about afghanistan. they weren't talking about the fight they were in. this isn't surprising, but when you're deployed you want to make sure everything's okay at home. >> soldiers and marines in the middle of a war zone worrying about getting paid. >> they always worry about getting paid. they just sort of expect it to happen. >> reporter: you said that if, in fact, paychecks were held up, that many in the services would be devastated by missing a single paycheck
, that's clear, isn't it? so there he was, he was making his 15th trip to afghanistan and it was while he was over at camp leatherneck that the marines asked him, okay, if there are a bunch of pentagon cuts, how is that going to affect our equipment and stuff like that. and wherever he has gone so far during this particular swing through the country of afghanistan, the troops are saying are we going to get paid? and he's saying, i don't know. just know this whatever you are owed you'll get paid eventually. you know, and this is how this works down. if we do, talking about if we go into a debt ceiling where we can't pay our bills technically which i don't agree with anyway, let's say, the president has the tablt to decide who gets paid when. clearly the debt is going to get paid first. china and saudi arabia are paid before our military, as bad as that sounds, that has to happen, so our borrowing costs don't go through the roof and then pay the military and social security, and if you dodonn tt order, give the department of education money first, it's the president's fault. it's not congre
gets paid and what doesn't. that's causing anxiety from wall street to the battle fields of afghanistan. as the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, discovered for himself today, nbc's jim wikachenski is traveling with him. >> reporter: here at the hot spots of kandahar, american soldiers and marines are still dodging bullets, rockets and road side bombs every day. amazingly, when they had a chance to throw questions at the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, their number one concern was the ongoing debate back home over the debt ceiling. >> the checkbook is not unlimited. >> reporter: admiral mullen told soldiers at kandahar that if the talks failed they'd still have to fight but they might not get paid. >> there are plenty of you that are living paycheck to paycheck. so if paychecks were to stop, it can have a devastating impact and it can have a devastating impact pretty quickly. >> reporter: at camp leatherneck, mullen told marines given the state of the u.s. economy, all the services face a cutback in the size of the force, and maybe e
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)